Addiction Environmental Factors

Last Updated: Sep 20th 2019

Reviewed by Brittany Polansky

A woman considers the addiction environmental factors influencing her problematic lifestyleOverall, many factors contribute to addiction development. A few of these include mental health, genetics, and environmental factors. Surprisingly, the specific details of our environment can increase the chances of addiction. Take a closer look at the most common addiction environmental factors which could potentially lead you down the wrong path.

Domestic Abuse or Poor Parenting Practices

The presence of abuse during childhood can increase the likelihood of developing addiction later in life. Additionally, poor parenting practices have the same negative effect. Unfortunately, the two often occur simultaneously.

Furthermore, when children or teens experience abuse or poor parenting they’re far more likely to struggle with future substance abuse problems. This could create a lifelong struggle. Anyone with a substance abuse history or family instability has a higher risk for addiction development. Being aware of this hopefully, convinces you to use caution when experimenting with drugs or alcohol.

Peer Substance Abuse

Research suggests individuals are heavily influenced by who they surround themselves with. If you surround yourself with peers who use drugs or alcohol excessively, you’re more likely to face addiction.

Overall, the most obvious way to address this particular risk is by choosing the right peers. For children and teens, this might mean finding a new environment altogether. After recovery, spending time with peers who still abuse substances makes relapse more likely.

Lack of a Strong Social Network

A strong social network can be an effective addiction deterrent. Moreover, when people have a lot of close friends, they’re more likely to seek help before substance abuse develops into addiction. Individuals with strong social networks are more likely to have better control over their lives as well.

Boredom or Lack of Stimulation

Boredom may be the most surprising environmental factor. Simply put, having nothing to do makes a person more likely to experiment with drugs. The more people try new drugs and illicit substance combinations, the more likely addiction development is.

Above all, one of the best methods for fighting potential addiction is through finding personal purpose and fulfillment. This could be a new job, interesting education, or volunteer work. Developing hobbies and passions is key to avoiding boredom and lack of stimulation that may lead to drug use.

Addressing Addiction Environmental Factors in Recovery

At 1st Step Behavioral Health, recovery includes a focus on environmental factors. In order to prevent alcohol or drug addiction relapse, we take time to properly address these issues. Through therapy and relapse prevention education, patients learn to protect their future sobriety. The effective, comprehensive addiction treatment methods we offer include

Conclusively, environmental factors contribute to the development of addiction in serious and lasting ways. At 1st Step Behavioral Health in Pompano Beach, Florida we take these factors into consideration to prevent relapse. Call (866) 319-6126 now, if you’re ready to break free from addiction environmental factors and begin sober living.

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by Brittany Polansky

Brittany PolanskyBrittany has been working in behavioral health since 2012 and is a Primary Clinician at our facility. She is an LCSW and holds a master’s degree in social work. She has great experience with chemical dependency and co-occurring mental health diagnoses as well as various therapeutic techniques. Brittany is passionate about treating all clients with dignity and respect, and providing a safe environment where clients can begin their healing journey in recovery.

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