A man struggles with heroin abuse.In the United States, heroin abuse is a growing problem. Therefore, if you’ve ever used the drug, you know it rarely turns out well. Heroin is one of the most addictive substances, and most experts agree it’s difficult to use the substance recreationally without developing an addiction.

Triggers For Heroin Use

When people use heroin for the first time, they may experience unpleasant effects, including intense nausea. However, most users agree that the first high is extremely euphoric. The problem is, additional doses never feel as good as the first.

Even one dose of heroin affects the way you experience pleasure. For example, people who use the drug have trouble feeling happy without it. Even when actively using heroin, they never feel as ecstatic as they did from that first high.

Some people use heroin to enhance parties or to get through everyday mundanity. Others use it to relieve anxiety, stress, or pain. Some people may take it in hopes of treating a mental illness or to cope with emotional trauma. Most of the time, teens or young adults try heroin to fit in with their peers.

Overall, one of the major causes of heroin abuse is pain pill abuse. People start using prescription opioid pain medications to treat a medical condition. However, they quickly develop an addiction and turn to heroin as a cheap alternative.

Heroin Abuse vs Addiction

You might wonder if you can use heroin recreationally without developing an addiction. It’s understandable you’d want to feel euphoric on a daily basis. However, frequently abusing heroin is never a productive, healthy way to live.

When you use heroin, your brain floods with feel-good chemicals. Thus, your body responds by shutting down its production of mood-enhancing, pain-relieving neurotransmitters. Consequently, when you come off of the high, you feel worse than you did before. You might crave using again because it’s the quickest way to feel better.

Overall, the more you use heroin, the more you crave it. Your body adjusts by developing a drug tolerance. Therefore, you need to use higher, more frequent doses to achieve the same effects.

Many people assume they can try heroin once or twice without developing an addiction. This mentality usually leads to a substance abuse problem. If you use heroin to wind down on the weekends or relieve anxiety periodically, you’ll begin to rely on it when life gets particularly challenging.

It’s not your fault. Heroin changes your brain chemistry. It’s easier to cope with life’s stressors by simply injecting yourself with numbness than working to build healthy coping mechanisms.

Heroin Effects

Generally, individuals can overdose from heroin even after one use. Other short-term drug side effects include:

• Dry mouth
• Feeling flushed
• Nausea or vomiting
• Itching
• Confusion
• Drifting in and out of consciousness

In the long run, people who use heroin severely damage their physical and mental health. For example, they may develop infections and abscesses. Not to mention, people who inject the drug may suffer from collapsed veins. Both men and women might experience reproductive dysfunction as well.

Those with heroin addiction often lose the ability to function productively. For example, they might miss appointments or fail to carry out their duties. In addition, they’re more likely to commit crimes or suffer financial difficulties.

Treating Heroin Addiction

Heroin controls your life. Quitting involves more than willpower or the desire to stop using.

Fortunately, a high-quality rehab center, such as 1st Step Behavioral Health, can give you the necessary support to detox and begin the path to recovery. We offer a variety of programs to help patients heal, including:

Inpatient
Outpatient
• Long-term care
Life skills training
Relapse prevention treatment

If you’re looking for heroin abuse help, call 1st Step Behavioral Health at 866-319-6126 now.