Adderall addiction often begins innocently through an actual prescription to the drug. Doctors prescribe Adderall for those struggling with signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But people often misuse their prescription or gain Adderall without doctors’ approval to focus better on work deadlines or studies. No one intends to become addicted to this helpful drug, but Adderall addiction can easily become a problem.

Adderall Addiction Is Progressive and Takes Hold

adderall addiction

Adderall can be life-changing for people who have problems with hyperactivity and attention deficit. Instead of failing classes and struggling with normal work loads because of diagnosed ADHD, people who need Adderall benefit from the focus and calm it can bring to their day. A prescription for Adderall may also be provided for people with sleep issues or severe depression.

Adderall is a combination of dextroamphetamine and amphetamine that stimulates a greater level of alertness and attention in the brain. It achieves this by increasing the amount of dopamine present. But for people abusing Adderall, the increase in this “feel good” chemical of the brain rewards their misuse of the ADHD drug, also making them want to use Adderall more and more.

Adderall is known for its euphoric and stimulating qualities. Once Adderall addiction has become an issue, the brain requires the drug to be alert and productive. People who have abused Adderall then find that they can’t function well without maintaining use. If they don’t have access to Adderall, they become foggy and sluggish.

Other signs of Adderall addiction include:

  • Needing increasingly higher doses of Adderall to feel the same effects as before
  • Taking the medication despite knowing it’s harmful
  • Inability to complete work or fulfill daily needs without the drug
  • Spending a lot of money obtaining Adderall
  • Inability to feel alert without this medication

If you have started abusing Adderall or have become addicted to the ADHD medication, you may have originally believed it to be safe. But the reality is that Adderall can create long-term side effects and overcoming addiction to it is a real struggle. You may have started using Adderall for any of the following purposes:

  • Weight loss
  • Athletic performance
  • Recreational high
  • Studying
  • Staying awake
  • Work completion
  • Organization and accomplishment of more daily tasks

Signs that You or Someone You Love Is Struggling with Adderall Addiction

It can be hard to recognize when someone abuses Adderall. For others, there are clear signs of misuse or Adderall addiction.

Because Adderall is often abused by people who are driven to accomplish certain goals in life, the average Adderall user doesn’t look like a “typical addict.” People misusing it may want to achieve greater athleticism, better grades, higher work performance or weight loss. Students, young professionals and even busy parents frequently obtain Adderall illegally.

Signs that may indicate you or someone you love are misusing Adderall include:

  • Being excessively talkative
  • Low or diminished appetite
  • Social withdrawal
  • Odd excitability
  • Financial problems
  • Aggressive behaviors
  • Sleeping too much
  • Secretive activities or behaviors

Once Adderall addiction is present, you may experience these feelings when you try to stop using the drug:

  • Intense cravings
  • Depression
  • Low energy
  • Disrupted sleep
  • Irritability
  • Headaches
  • Oversleeping
  • Suicidal thoughts or actions
  • Anxiety
  • Body aches
  • Concentration problems
  • Increased appetite
  • Nightmares

1st Step Behavioral Health in Pompano Beach, Florida Cares When You Can’t

When you feel overwhelmed by the struggle of addiction to Adderall, other drugs or alcohol, 1st Step Behavioral Health in Pompano Beach will care for you. 1st Step Behavioral Health provides residential, partial hospitalization, outpatient and intensive outpatient rehab for patients addicted to Adderall.

When you or your loved one enter 1st Step Behavioral Health, you receive focused, comprehensive therapy treatment centered around what has been shown to work effectively. You engage in your own treatment with the help of a primary care therapist and do real self-improvement work, instead of taking a “country club” style vacation from reality. At 1st Step Behavioral Health, all effort goes toward recovery for your best chance of long-term sobriety.

Treatment is provided through a level of care that extends into later phases of recovery through your own personal recovery coach. Under this coach’s guidance, you receive job and recovery instruction at a deeper level than most other rehab programs provide.

If you or someone you love is struggling with Adderall, other drug or alcohol addiction, call 1st Step Behavioral Health now at 866-319-6126. True recovery is waiting for you.

Behavioral Signs Of Adderall Abuse: What Are Your Chances To Become An Adderall Addict?

So far we have discussed that Adderall is a very potent stimulant is and recognizing when a person is getting addicted to it is hard. People abuse this drug for various reasons and enhancing productivity and alertness is one of the top reasons. 

What distinguishes this medicine from other drugs is the fact that it is used by a motivated individual, such as a student, who is different from stereotypical drug abusers. As mentioned earlier, a lot of them are young professionals or students who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. 

Typically, doctors prescribe Adderall to treat ADHD or narcolepsy. One of the plus points of prescribing Adderall is that it is an immediate-release medicine, which means the entire drug dose can be administered at a time.  

The effects of the drug last at least four to six hours. There is another form of Adderall, which is the extended-release version and is commonly called Adderall XR. It takes time to release while its effects last for approximately twelve hours. The extended-release is basically formulated for ADHD patients who don’t want to take the medicine two to three times in a day. 

The interesting thing is that regardless of the type of Adderall you‘re on, it counts as a Schedule II controlled substance. That means you cannot obtain it without a doctor’s prescription. If you want to refill your prescription, you must be re-prescribed by your physician once he evaluates your condition. 

 It is simply because the US Drug Enforcement Agency classifies Adderall as a high potential medicine that can be abused easily. It may lead to serious physical and psychological addiction or dependence. 

This is one of the reasons that increase the risk of Adderall addiction, if someone consumes high doses, even to treat the symptoms of ADHD. Considering this, therapists at 1stStep Behavioral Health Center provide comprehensive therapies and recommend patients to stay alert of the long-term side-effects of Adderall addiction.

Behavioral Signs of Adderall Abuse

Although there are a plethora of behavioral signs to identify an Adderall abuser, these typical signs depend on some particular practices. For example, if you inject Adderall, you will need some appropriate paraphernalia. It is the same equipment you need to use other injectable drugs, including spoon, syringe, lighter or a heating device. You’ll also need something to crush Adderall, such as a hammer, pestle, and a mortar and espresso stopper. 

Moreover, the behavioral signs also include the way an abuser pays for Adderall drugs. Plus, if an abuser becomes habitual of remising his/her personal grooming, then you will a noticeable change in the abuser’s level of self-care. 

 There is no doubt that these can be strong indications and behavioral signs of someone becoming an Adderall addict. It is important to remember that a strong addiction to this drug may draw a person farther and farther from their daily activities, including grooming and social life. An addict may become secretive and socially isolated as well. 

About the Author: Brittany Polansky

Brittany PolanskyBrittany has been working in behavioral health since 2012 and is a Primary Clinician at our facility. She is an LCSW and holds a master’s degree in social work. She has great experience with chemical dependency and co-occurring mental health diagnoses as well as various therapeutic techniques. Brittany is passionate about treating all clients with dignity and respect, and providing a safe environment where clients can begin their healing journey in recovery.