What Is Nar-Anon & How Can It Help Families of Recovering Addicts?

If you’ve been reading about substance abuse and how it affects families, you’ve likely run across information about various support groups and organizations, including many 12-Step groups. You may be wondering, exactly what is Nar-Anon? How can it help?  

What is Nar-Anon?

Nar-Anon is a 12-Step fellowship established to provide support for people with an addicted family member or friend.  Nar-Anon is separate from Narcotics Anonymous, which offers support for people who are battling a drug addiction.   

It can be confusing, but it may help to look at it this way: Alcoholics Anonymous, which was created to help alcoholics get clean and sober, is the original 12-Step group. Al-Anon is a program for friends and family members of alcoholics. Narcotics Anonymous and Nar-Anon are built on the same principles and operate much the same way; however, the focus of Nar-Anon isn’t alcohol, but drugs.

Nar-Anon Family Support Groups

Addiction is a chronic disorder that changes the chemical and physical makeup of the brain. It isn’t a sign of weakness or a character flaw, and it can happen to anybody without regard for wealth, education, upbringing, or social standing. Addiction is a family problem. Although the struggle is devastating for the addict, it can be just as difficult for the people who care about that person, including parents, children, spouses, partners, and close friends. 

Nar-Anon is an international fellowship created to support people with an addicted loved one and to help them understand the disease of addiction. Twelve-Step groups have a strong spiritual component, and members recite the Serenity Prayer at all meetings. However, beliefs are personal and are never discussed. Although you may hear members talking about a “higher power,” or “God as we understand him,” you will never be asked about your faith. 

Nar-Anon meetings are safe and welcoming, and anonymity is an essential component. Chairs are generally arranged in a circle to encourage open communication, and you will be encouraged to share your story with other members when you feel comfortable. Membership is free and open to everyone, and donations fund expenses such as supplies, refreshments, or rent for the meeting space. Meetings are usually weekly, although individual groups may have different schedules. 

The Nar-Anon fellowship also includes Narateen groups for young people whose lives have been affected by a friend or relative’s drug addiction. Narateen meetings are facilitated by two Nar-Anon members — one male and one female.  There’s no doubt that all family members play an essential role in recovery

What Are the 12 Steps of Nar-Anon?

The 12 Steps of Nar-Anon, based on the steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, are devised to help people who are coping with the addiction of a loved one. Members focus on tenets such as looking inward, willingness to change, surrender, self-disclosure, humility, hope, acceptance, making amends, continued spiritual growth, and service to others.

1. We admitted we were powerless over the addict — that our lives had become unmanageable.

2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.  

3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.  

4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves. 

5. Admitted to God, ourselves, and another human being the exact nature of our wrongs. 

6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.  

7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.  

9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible except when to do so would injure them or others.  

10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.

11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out. 

12. Having had a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others and to practice these principles in all our affairs. 

How to Start a Nar-Anon Group

If you don’t have Nar-Anon family support groups in your area, it isn’t difficult to form a new group with at least three members. Begin by finding a meeting place, which may be a room in a church, community center, hospital, office building, or meeting hall. 

Once you’ve established a core group and a meeting place, you’re ready to register the new group on the Nar Anon website or by snail mail. You can also purchase a new group packet that includes sample meeting guidelines and formats, information for families and newcomers, and other literature to get you started. Outreach packets and posters can help you spread the word about the new family support group. 

Nar-Anon Online Meetings

Many Nar-Anon groups offer virtual meetings as a response to the Covid-19 pandemic. Some have returned to in-person meetings, while others continue to meet online. Contact individual groups in your area for specific information. 

Nar-Anon in South Florida

If you’re looking for a Nar-Anon meeting in Florida, there’s a good chance you can find one in your area. At least 70 fellowships, including in-person and virtual groups, are listed on the Florida Region Nar-Anon Family Groups website.  You can also call the Florida Region Helpline at 1-888-947-8885.

Take the First Step: Find Support Today

If somebody you love is battling drug addiction, you may be overwhelmed with feelings of anger, frustration, confusion, anxiety, guilt, or shame. You may feel afraid, isolated, and alone. Relationships may be hanging on the precipice or damaged almost beyond repair.

If your life has been affected by the addiction of a loved one, the team at 1st Step Behavioral Health can help with resources and information on available programs, including Nar-Anon and other 12-Step support groups. If you think your loved one may benefit from professional treatment, we can discuss that, too. Contact us online or give us a call at 855-425-4846. 

goal of cognitive therapy

How The Goal Of Cognitive Therapy Can Help You Beat Your Drug Addiction

Addiction is a complicated disease that affects both body and mind. Over time, substance abuse can compound emotional and behavioral issues that may touch nearly every aspect of an addict’s life.

In the end, addiction can leave your life a broken mess. So when it comes time to pick up the pieces, you need every tool available so you can win this painful battle.

One of the strongest means of understanding yourself, your addiction, and how you can stay sober comes from cognitive behavioral therapy or CBT.

But what is this powerful treatment option and how can it set you up for success?

Keep reading to find out more about the goal of cognitive therapy and how it can help you overcome your drug addiction.

What is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Cognitive behavioral therapy, often shortened to CBT, is one of the most popular forms of psychotherapy.

Though it’s quite popular, it’s also relatively new, with its origins rooted in the 1960s.

Dr. Aaron Beck created CBT as a means of examining patients symptoms more thoroughly instead of simply looking for a solution. He felt that by better understanding a patient’s cognitive behaviors, it was possible to identify underlying issues and create a more effective treatment plan on a patient-by-patient basis.

Since its inception, the effectiveness of CBT has been the subject of many studies, almost all of which have found CBT to be a useful and efficient form of treatment.

It’s also a versatile treatment plan. CBT is useful in the treatment of a variety of disorders or behavioral problems common in addicts or recovering addicts, such as:

  • Anxiety.
  • Depression.
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
  • Eating disorders.
  • Extreme anger.
  • Marital concerns.

CBT is often far more limited than other forms of psychotherapy. As a result, it may also be a quicker form of therapy.

What Is the Goal of Cognitive Therapy?

The primary objective of CBT is to address and understand mental processes that cause unwanted feelings or behaviors.

For addicts, this means tackling tough subjects like one’s reasons for using drugs while also addressing how a person’s drug use may impact their interpersonal relationships.

Most CBT practitioners believe that unwanted behaviors such as addiction are caused by automatic negative thoughts or ANTs.

Say a person begins experimenting with drugs as a means of self-medicating. Soon, they may start to feel guilty about their drug use, which further exacerbates these negative thought patterns. This spiral of negativity can quickly manifest into a variety of other destructive thought patterns and behaviors.

In essence, CBT is less concerned with how an addict started using, instead, focusing on why they use.

What to Expect from a First CBT Session

CBT can be an overwhelming experience, especially if you’ve never tried other forms of psychotherapy.

However, demystifying the process can make the ordeal far less intimidating and can help you gain the courage to seek treatment.

Here are a few things to expect from your first therapy session.

An Overview of CBT

First and foremost, your doctor will provide you with a quick history of CBT as well as its relevance to the world of addiction.

Expect to hear some things you may have learned about from this article, as well as an overview of your doctor’s history.

Questions About General Health

Your doctor will likely ask a few basic questions about your general health, as well as your genetic history.

In many instances, addiction can be genetic, so it’s important to be forthcoming and honest with your doctor if your family has a history of addiction.

Questions About Drug Usage

On the subject of honesty, it’s crucial that you tell the entire truth about your history of drug use. Though it may be uncomfortable, what you say to your doctor is kept confidential provided you’re not a risk to yourself or someone else.

You’ll provide your doctor with a general timeline of your history of drug use.

Be sure to include things like the first time you started using when you started to notice signs of addiction and any events that led to you choosing to seek treatment.

Questions About History of Mental Health

There’s a distinct correlation between mental health risks and substance abuse. Almost half of all substance abusers also struggle with their mental health.

Furthermore, both addiction and mental health conditions are inheritable. Exploring your family history of mental health conditions can help you better understand the hurdles you’re facing.

A Bit of Discomfort

Understandably, these may not be subjects you’re excited to talk about. That’s reasonable.

As a result, you can expect to feel shy or a little nervous during your first visit. Still, be open and honest with your therapist, no matter how nervous you’re feeling.

Discussion of Personal Goals

The first session is often the most important, as it’s where you and your therapist establish your goals.

You may want to better understand your reasons for using drugs, for instance. Or maybe you’re hoping to identify triggers that lead to destructive behaviors.

Your goals should align with your personal wellness as well as your long term strategy for sustained recovery.

Homework

Your therapist will likely send you home with a questionnaire or exercise to complete before your next session.

These assignments are short, easy ways to solidify the things you’ve talked about during your CBT sessions. And don’t worry, there isn’t a ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ way to complete an exercise.

It’s all about better understanding yourself.

Finding a Reputable Therapist

If you like what you’ve read thus far, you may have an interest in finding a treatment option near you. That’s great!

However, finding the right therapist can take a great deal of time. Also, many therapists have a waiting list, so it may be a few weeks before your first session.

When looking for a therapist, consider:

  • Your insurance.
  • Their experience level.
  • Their areas of expertise and how it aligns with your needs.
  • Their certifications.

Depending on the severity of your addiction, it may be best to consider an inpatient treatment plan at first as a means of jumpstarting your sobriety.

CBT and Recovery: A Match Made in Heaven

By providing you with newer, healthier thought patterns and a better understanding of your history with addiction, CBT can be a powerful tool that can help you sustain your sobriety long after you leave rehab.

The goal of cognitive therapy is to give you the strength needed to overcome your addiction. Though it may seem impossible at first, over time you’ll learn more effective coping strategies and ways to escape negative thought patterns.

A better life begins with you. If you’d like to learn more about addiction treatment options, be sure to get in touch today.

long-term effects of heroin use

Understanding the Long-Term Effects of Heroin Use on the Body and Mind

Each year, more than 170,000 people in the United States try heroin for the first time. 

The opioid crisis has and will continue to affect the lives of thousands. But these numbers don’t even count the friends and families who suffer while watching their loved one battle their addiction disorder.

While the symptoms of heroin abuse begin with poor personal hygiene, the long-term effects of heroin use are much more dangerous. Before you or a loved one begins to experience these sometimes fatal symptoms, you should seek help. 

Not sure what signs to look for? Here are the mental and physical symptoms most commonly seen in long-term heroin users.

Mental Effects of Heroin Use

Many people start using heroin to self-medicate mental disorders like depression and anxiety. While the euphoria of heroin use may seem to help these conditions at first, the long term effects of heroin use, actually make the symptoms of a mental disorder worse. 

That’s because chronic heroin use has been shown to cause damage to white matter in the brain. 

White matter is tissue that contains neurons and axons, which are both vital to healthy brain function. When these cells are damaged or destroyed in heroin addiction, they are extremely slow to recover. 

Meanwhile, a heroin user will experience problems with:

  • impulse control
  • processing and responding to stress
  • decision making
  • processing information
  • learning new information

Heroin cravings, tolerance, and addiction are also due to the mental effects of heroin abuse.

That’s because of the neurotransmitter, Dopamine. Dopamine is the way the brain reinforces or rewards and encourages a behavior. When people use heroin, a cascade of Dopamine is released, making them feel euphoria.

The euphoric effects of Dopamine reinforce heroin-taking behavior. This leads the user to crave heroin and feel like they need more heroin to live.

After administering heroin over and over, users develop a tolerance to heroin. This tolerance means they need to take more heroin to feel the same effects they did that first time. When heroin users experience cravings and tolerance, they have developed an addiction disorder. 

The most frightening fact about heroin use is that, while tolerance decreases over time, cravings for heroin may never go away. Those who seek help, though, have a better chance at quitting heroin for good.

Mental Symptoms of Withdrawal

Withdrawal occurs when a heroin addict stops using. In long-term users, these symptoms typically show up 2-3 days after cessation of use. Users who already have a mental health condition may experience exacerbated symptoms of their disorder during withdrawal.

The psychological symptoms of withdrawal include:

  • severe depression
  • feelings of emptiness
  • suicidal ideation or attempts
  • anxiety
  • panic attacks
  • insomnia

These symptoms eventually cease. Yet the pain inflicted on family and friends by suicidal behaviors may last an entire lifetime.

Physical Signs of Heroin Use

The symptoms of heroin use can damage a person’s body just as much as they damage the mind. 

Facial appearance can drastically change. Symptoms like swollen gums, damaged teeth, and skin abscesses can make a user virtually unrecognizable to family and friends. 

But that’s only the beginning. 

The long-term effects of heroin use include chronic constipation and severe stomach cramping. Heroin addicts experience poor sex drive and men often develop irreversible erectile dysfunction. Women often report irregular or stopped menstrual cycles, which may affect their ability to have children. 

The way the user administers heroin to the bloodstream leads to different symptoms as well. 

Snorting causes damage to the nasal lining and the septum. Smoking leads to lung infection, pneumonia, and even cancer of the mouth, throat, and lung. Intravenous methods lead to collapsed veins, infections of the heart lining and valves, as well as heart disease. 

More severe physical symptoms of heroin use are:

  • liver and kidney disease
  • arthritis
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis

The scariest symptom of all, however, has to be death. More than 15,000 Americans die each year from a heroin overdose.

There is a common misconception that heroin overdose only occurs in individuals with low heroin tolerance. The truth is that any heroin user could die at any time. Infected needles, tainted supply, or even extremely pure supply are all known causes of a heroin overdose. 

Physical Symptoms of Withdrawal

Long-term heroin use also causes physical symptoms of withdrawal after cessation. These flu-like symptoms are often associated with continued use of heroin even after heroin tolerance makes it difficult to experience the euphoric effects.

Physical symptoms of heroin withdrawal include:

  • restlessness
  • muscle and bone pain
  • insomnia
  • diarrhea and vomiting
  • cold flashes
  • goosebumps
  • involuntary leg movements

While these symptoms usually go away after 7-10 days, some long-term heroin users experience symptoms for a month or longer. 

Treatment for the Long-Term Effects of Heroin Use

The long-term effects of heroin usecan be devastating not only to the user but also for their friends and family. The drug-seeking behaviors heroin users participate in often cause tension and conflict in relationships. Meanwhile, loved ones are devastated watching the user suffer from their addiction disorder. 

The good news is there is something you can do. 

Medication-assisted therapy has been shown to help with the mental effects of heroin as well as the physical signs of heroin use. Therapy helps to improve impulsive behaviors while medication decreases the symptoms of withdrawal. 

A treatment center is a great option for many heroin users since rehabilitation clinics like 1st Step offer services that are handcrafted for individual needs and goals for recovery. Patients are supported by professionals and have a community of patients to share the experience. 

If you or a loved one is ready to seek help, contact us or get in touch for more information about our rehab program. 

False Memories And Their Role In Addiction

For decades, if not centuries, addiction has generally been viewed as some type of moral failure or a general lack of personal discipline. In truth, addiction is a form of pain management. The problem is that while medical science can generally determine the cause of most types of physical pain or discomfort, that is not the only type of pain that humans endure. Psychological and emotional damage can create a pain that is every bit a real as a broken arm or a bullet wound, but there are few, if any, tests to discover that type of damage. This often leads people to believe their wounds simply aren’t real, when in fact they are. 

Memories are the internal record we keep of things that have happened to us. The tricky part about memories, however, is that they are not always an accurate representation of what actually happened. Two people can experience the exact same thing and yet later have a completely different memory of it. Memories are actually a compilation of not only events that occurred but also how we interpreted those events. When we misinterpret events it creates something psychologists often refer to as false memories. False memories are often one of the many root causes of drug abuse. Having a false memory doesn’t necessarily mean the event the individual is remembering didn’t happen, it simply means they may have misinterpreted the event as being something it wasn’t. 

Sometimes, creating false memories is a coping mechanism to deal with trauma. For instance, if a child was sexually abused, they may create a memory of always having a lovely time fishing with their father, while conveniently forgetting the part where their father abused them in the fishing cabin. Other false memory examples can include things an individual may have been told that never actually happened. They may “remember” them as memories because they have been told them so many times, but they don’t actually have a legitimate memory of something happening. For instance, if a child is told often that they are bad, they may have memories of themselves being bad, when in fact they never were. They may blow small instances up in their head to be much larger than they were to fit in with the narrative they were told about themselves. It was a narrative which they believed, which became a false memory. 

What causes false memories is generally some type of trauma. In some cases, false memories are the result of negative messages we were given about ourselves and in other cases creating false memories is an attempt to protect ourselves from painful truths. One way or the other, however, the only way to heal is to dig down deep to unearth these false memories and correct them with truth. This is one of the many aims and goals of most addiction treatments. 

If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction in or around Pompano Beach, we can help. Give us a call today and let us help you get started on a path to freedom. 

Studies into Relapse

Arguably the most difficult period of substance use disorder treatment isn’t the process of rehab in a treatment facility, but trying to not relapse after leaving the center. In fact, one of the most common thing patients treated for addictions don’t realize until they’re in treatment is that it is considered a chronic illness specifically for this very reason. The sometimes daily struggle against cravings can be challenging if not outright terribly difficult and claims thousands of recovering addicts a year, sometimes costing them their life. While relapse does not mean that treatment has failed, it is still a responsibility that often goes understated.

The University of Pennsylvania Epigenetics Institute’s Elizabeth Heller, Ph.D. has taken an interest in this part of addiction and why relapse is so common even when all traces and access to the drug is minimized or eliminated. Heller’s hypothesis is that understanding the persistent nature of the symptoms of drug abuse even during abstinence requires consideration of epigenetic changes caused by the drugs themselves.  

Dr. Heller explains, “Without changing the actual sequence of DNA, we have mechanisms in our body to control how and when cells express certain genes. These mechanisms are influenced by changes in our environment, and the process of influencing gene expression without altering the basic genetic code is called epigenetics.” To put it another way, without changing the actual sequence of DNA, there are mechanisms in the body to control how and when to express certain genes which are often influenced by things like the environment.

Heller’s most recent research went into the effects of cocaine addiction in relation to epigenetics. Of note, the FosB gene, an already suspected as responsible in addiction behaviors. The findings of the study showed that cocaine depletes the protein that helps regulate and attenuate response to use of the drug, contributing to it’s addictive properties. In addiction to FosB, Nr4a1 is hijacked by drug use, which is important in dopamine release.

Where this crosses over with cancer research, mice were administered a drug used in cancer treatments that suppresses Nr4a1. The tests revealed that mice who had taken the drug were far more likely to resist the normal environmental cues that normally trigger them to seek and use the provided cocaine. What was noticed more, though, was that the changes in gene expression of both were stronger when the mice were not using the drug, suggesting how and why relapse is so common in chronic cocaine abuse after initial detox and treatment.

As research continues, the specific changes that occur with drug use can possibly be prevented, where one might imagine a ‘cocaine vaccine’ or similar drug resulting from these studies to reverse what cocaine does to your brain.

Before someone can worry about relapse, they require treatment first at centers like First Step in Pompano Beach. Give us a call today to speak with our staff about treatment options.

How to Deal with Stress After Rehab

Make a habit of putting yourself first. This may be counterintuitive, but don’t forget that no matter what life brings, but especially in the tempest that can be drug or alcohol addiction treatment and recovery, you need to make sure all of your basic human needs are met before you start worrying about anyone else’s.

 

Take yourself out on the town and have a good, safe, sober time. There are lots of things to do other than drink or get high. Go to the movies, have a dinner date with a friend and get burgers, fries and a coke, old school style, feel free to substitute salad if you’re a vegetarian. You can go to a club and dance all night long while drinking sparkling water and lime. Try getting a pedicure and an ice cream cone.

Take long luxurious baths. One of the things that is great about rehab is it teaches you that prioritizing correctly helps you remember that sometimes the simple things in life are the most important. And sometimes one of those simple things is allowing yourself the space to relax and breathe. For some recovering addicts this can happen with plenty of bubbles and a good audio book.

Taking care of yourself is pretty hard. It often doesn’t’ come second nature to us because we are taught to make sure we are thinking of others first. Being thoughtful is important but you can’t possibly care for someone very well if your own needs are unmet.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction in the Florida area, it’s time to seek out help for drug abuse and alcohol addiction. Through our replacement therapy or whatever is the best drug rehab for you, you can work through your trauma and addiction and you can come out the other side ready to do the hard work of a successful and sober life. Call us today at (866) 319-6126 or contact us online for help with your drug or alcohol addiction.

 

This Is What You *Should* Say to Your Loved One Struggling with Drug Addictions pt 4

Knowing what to say to a friend who has been struggling with addiction is hard. It can feel like there is nothing good to do or say. But the most important thing to remember is that the worst thing you can say, is nothing at all. Silence feeds your friend’s shame. Speak up. Here are some things you can say to a loved one addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even struggling with gambling addiction.

Read Part 3 Here

 

I love you and I’m so grateful you got help. One of the most difficult thing as a human is to admit when we are wrong. Even harder is to admit that we need help, desperately, and can’t go on without it. That’s the kind of thing it takes to get help from addiction, but go one step further. It takes an incomprehensible amount of strength and courage to admit that you need help for something that society says is selfish and the result of your own choices. Let them know that you know that addiction is the result of more than just their choices. That you know they are dealing with a diagnosis not their own delinquency. Let them know that you are so glad they got help.

 

Doing medically supervised detox and going through a  drug rehab program sounds really hard! You worked so hard! Acknowledging someone’s hard work like that is one of the most affirming things for someone to do for a friend. We don’t let people know that we see their hard work and hustle nearly enough, especially when the hard work was so wrought with vulnerability and psychological rigor. You will never know how much that kind of affirmation will do for them.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction in the Florida area, it’s time to seek out help for drug abuse and alcohol addiction. Through our replacement therapy or whatever the is the best drug rehab for you, you can work through your trauma and addiction and you can come out the other side ready to do the hard work of a successful and sober life.

Read This Series from Part 1

Call us today at (866) 319-6126

 

This Is What You *Should* Say to Your Loved One Struggling with Drug Addictions pt 3

Knowing what to say to a friend who has been struggling with addiction is hard. It can feel like there is nothing good to do or say. But the most important thing to remember is that the worst thing you can say, is nothing at all. Silence feeds your friend’s shame. Speak up. Here are some things you can say to a loved one addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even struggling with gambling addiction.

Read Part 2 Here

 

Do you want to get coffee sometime? Invite your friend out to talk and laugh. Don’t forget that even though they are dealing with addiction and just got back from an alcohol detox facility, they may want a break from talking and thinking about it. Let them know you love them and you’re glad to have them back, but let them decide if they want to talk about it.

Can we take a walk or hike sometime? Not only for their wellbeing, taking a walk or a hike is just better for your bodies and better for a hangout than getting ice cream, right? First of all, moving your body is a great way for them to deal with anxiety or depression, but it will help you in the same way. Besides, a beautiful mountain is way better than an ice cream shop full of screaming kids, right?

I made a music playlist for you! Do you want to blow your friend away? Make them a present. A music playlist is free, takes an amount of thought and personal knowledge that your friend will feel so thought about and cared for. As you make it, think about your friend. Think about their personality and the music they love. Think about their struggle and their successes. What they need most right now is to be seen with a sense of compassion and love.

Can I make some meals for you to stock your freezer with? It seems very small town, but see if your friend would let you make some freezer meals to make it easy for them to get started back into their everyday lives. Something so easy as being able to just heat up a meal can do everything for morale when night falls and you’re exhausted from a full day.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction in the Florida area, it’s time to seek out help for drug abuse and alcohol addiction. Through our replacement therapy or whatever the is the best drug rehab for you, you can work through your trauma and addiction and you can come out the other side ready to do the hard work of a successful and sober life.

Read Part 4 Here

Call us today at (866) 319-6126

 

This Is What You *Should* Say to Your Loved One Struggling with Drug Addictions pt 2

 

Knowing what to say to a friend who has been struggling with addiction is hard. It can feel like there is nothing good to do or say. But the most important thing to remember is that the worst thing you can say, is nothing at all. Silence feeds your friend’s shame. Speak up. Here are some things you can say to a loved one addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even struggling with gambling addiction.

Read Part 1 Here

Some friends and I are going out to dinner, want to come? Again, invite your friend who is struggling with addiction out. But don’t forget to invite them out for group functions too. This will give them a sense of community. But it will also remind them that your group of friends hasn’t abandoned them. That you all care about them.

Invite them to outings that aren’t centered around addictive substances or gambling. Your friend just got back from rehab. Please remember that their hard work isn’t over. Going rehab for drug and alcohol addiction recovery doesn’t cure you, it gets you on the right path but your friend will have to make the choice every single day to remain sober. Don’t make it harder for them.

 

I’m in awe of your bravery. Remind them that you know how vulnerable they had to be to admit their struggle and get help. Help them remember how brave they are, and that they’ve come so far since they began their journey.

I’ll always have your back. Something that is invaluable in life is a friend who offers you unconditional friendship, love and genuine care. If your friend needs anything right now it is to just know everyone isn’t going to abandon them.

Can I watch your kids sometime? If your friend has children, maybe offer to babysit sometime. It’s really hard to find time to yourself when you have kids, especially young ones. Offer to take their kids to the zoo, or out for a meal, so they can take some time for self care.

Please remember to be as kind to yourself you are to me. Remind your friend that you appreciate all of the compassion and grace they have offered you in your friendship. And then remind them that you want them to offer those same considerations to themselves.

Don’t forget, whatever you say to your friend, do it in love and with compassion. If you approach your friend with honesty and vulnerability of your own, reconnecting with them should be a genuinely rewarding experience, just a good talk with your friend

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction in the Florida area, it’s time to seek out help for drug abuse and alcohol addiction. Through our replacement therapy or whatever the is the best drug rehab for you, you can work through your trauma and addiction and you can come out the other side ready to do the hard work of a successful and sober life.

Read Part 3 Here

Call us today at (866) 319-6126

 

This Is What You *Should* Say to Your Loved One Struggling with Drug Addictions pt 1

 

Knowing what to say to a friend who has been struggling with addiction is hard. It can feel like there is nothing good to do or say. But the most important thing to remember is that the worst thing you can say, is nothing at all. Silence feeds your friend’s shame. Speak up. Here are some things you can say to a loved one addicted to drugs, alcohol, or even struggling with gambling addiction.

 

I’m proud of you. Recovering from drug addiction or alcohol addiction can feel impossible. If your friend just got through going through addiction treatment let them know you are proud of them.

 

Remember to take care of yourself. Sometimes someone who is struggling with addiction forgets that it is still important to focus on self care even though they are back in the real world. Rehab is such a safe bubble that when you’re thrown back into the world it’s easy to let your focus shift. Remind your friend, gently, you care about them and to not forget to make themselves the priority.

 

I’m here to talk if you need to. Remind your friend that they have someone to talk to when they need to talk. When you’re addicted to a substance, it is easy to believe that anyone you tell about it will mock you, be disgusted or completely disappointed by your bad choices or mistakes. Show them that this isn’t the case. That you want to sit with them through the good and the bad.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction in the Florida area, it’s time to seek out help for drug abuse and alcohol addiction. Through our replacement therapy or whatever the is the best drug rehab for you, you can work through your trauma and addiction and you can come out the other side ready to do the hard work of a successful and sober life.

Read Part 2 Here

Call us today at (866) 319-6126