Drug Overdose – When the Emergency Room Trumps the Rehab Center

Last Updated: Sep 20th 2019

Reviewed by Brittany Polansky

How to Tell if Someone has Overdosed

Seeing a loved one go through overdose symptoms can be truly frightening, especially when some of the more serious symptoms strike. Nonetheless, if you do not know what you are looking out for or why, you might simply assume that the person is having some kind of different health issue and you may end up not getting them the help they need for their drug abuse problem.

Overdosing on drugs comes with a plethora of visible side effects. If someone has taken far too many drugs for their body to handle, they will more often than not experience or exhibit multiple symptoms, including the following:

  • Passing out
  • Loss of perception
  • Not responding
  • Seizure
  • Tremors
  • Convulsions
  • Irritation
  • Confusion
  • Disorientation
  • Violent behavior
  • High body temperatures
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Blue extremities
  • Drowning sounds
  • Breathing difficulties, including stopped breathing
  • Pupil dilation
  • Chest pain
  • Babbling
  • Severe incoordination

 

Get Immediate Help for an Overdose

Should you suspect that a loved one has overdosed on drugs, you need to act immediately and get them help. This isn’t a time to worry about whether they will get in trouble for using a substance, especially since overdose so often leads to death when people aren’t treated right away.

For a drug overdose, take the person to the nearest emergency room. Your quick action in doing so may be the difference between life and death for them.

 

After the Overdose has Been Handled

Watching someone go through an overdose and getting them treatment at the emergency room might seem like the problem has finally ended, but there is a good chance that the person has an addiction to drugs of some kind. Once they are out of the hospital for the overdose, contact us to determine the best course of action. We will help discover if the overdose was a one-time thing or whether a drug addiction is present.

 

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by Brittany Polansky

Brittany PolanskyBrittany has been working in behavioral health since 2012 and is a Primary Clinician at our facility. She is an LCSW and holds a master’s degree in social work. She has great experience with chemical dependency and co-occurring mental health diagnoses as well as various therapeutic techniques. Brittany is passionate about treating all clients with dignity and respect, and providing a safe environment where clients can begin their healing journey in recovery.