Adderall and Alcohol: Everything You Need to Know

Last Updated: Sep 21st 2020

Reviewed by Brittany Polansky

There is one thing found at any kind of party most people go to, and it’s alcohol. It’s a mainstay drink for almost any situation, and its use can be traced back throughout history. Yet, that doesn’t mean it’s safe.

In fact, alcohol is one of the most dangerous drugs. It kills around 2.8 million people per year. And since it’s found at parties and in dangerous situations, it’s usually mixed with other drugs. Drunk people aren’t known for their decision-making skills and usually create dangerous combinations.

One of the most frequent ones is Adderall. In fact, mixing Adderall and alcohol is a common combination in college campuses and with younger people. The combination can also have deadly consequences, and signal potentially addictive behavior down the line.

Keep reading below to learn more about mixing alcohol and Adderall, and why it can be a deadly combination.

Adderall Is Prescribed — It Can Have Different Effects

Although Adderall is frequently used recreationally, it’s actually a prescribed medicine designed for a specific kind of person. It’s usually given to people with an ADHD diagnosis and helps them achieve a calmer state of mind. It helps people with ADHD focus and feel calm.

Yet, for people without ADHD, the drug can have the opposite effects. It can make people become hyper-focused on things and extremely motivated. A person’s recreational Adderall use will usually spike when they have something to get done quickly.

During the time that a person is under Adderall’s effects, they’ll also experience physiological effects. A person’s heart rate may rise, and they may start sweating for seemingly no reason. They may also talk at a different pace than normal, struggling to get their words out.

People who use Adderall have a heightened sense of capability, and they end up feeling like they can do anything.

Adderall Is An Upper, But It Can Bring You Down

Even if Adderall makes people feel like they can do anything, it can still bring people down. The aftereffects of Adderall can be devastating, as people return to their normal states. They may yearn to reclaim the energy the pill gave them, along with the sense they had that anything was possible.

This is a precursor for serious addictive behavior down the line. The more a person craves Adderall, the more likely they are to abuse it and dull its effects. Then, after Adderall loses its edge, they may turn to harder drugs. For many, Adderall may just be the start of a long downfall.

Alcohol Always Brings People Down

Alcohol has a long history with almost all of humanity. It’s been a core part of all human history, and even though it’s a drug, it’s acceptable to use it. Most people know how to drink responsibility, and know when it’s time to put down the bottle.

Not everyone does, and for those people, alcohol can be dangerous. It’s literally a poison, and drinking too much at once can end up being fatal. It’s a blood thinner, which raises a person’s heart rate. It also dulls people’s senses as a result of slowed brain activity.

Frequent drinking has been linked to a variety of health risks, like stroke or cancer. It’s also a blood thinner, which can change the effects medication may have on a person. Drinking can also lead people to harmful situations, as it inhibits decision-making. Alcohol is a downer, and too much drinking will always bring someone down.

Lowered Inhibitions Is A Lowered Sense Of Life

The allure of drinking is to get drunk, for many people. It’s so many people’s drug of choice because it’s a legal way to dull their own perceptions of themselves and the world. All drug use is a form of escape, and alcohol is simply the easiest drug to get. The urge to drink excessively may come as a result of trauma or deeper issues.

Drinking doesn’t have to be a form of escapism, though. For many people, drinking is just a way to loosen up and have some fun. But for people who frequently drink to the point of blacking out, alcohol can be more than that. For those people, alcohol is like medicine — even if it’s literally a poison.

It Has Longer-Term Health Effects

Liver damage and cardiovascular risks are two of the most major consequences of long-term alcohol abuse. Yet, there’s a variety of physical ailments that have been attributed to alcohol use. And physical ailments aren’t even the full extent of how alcohol can harm a person.

Alcohol can also intensify any mental health issues a person may have, such as depression or anxiety. It affects a person’s memory, which can result in damage to their overall mental stability. Alcohol can also contribute to sexual assault, as a result of a person’s impaired decision making, which can create mental health issues.

Mixing An Upper And Downer Is Never Fun

Most people mix Adderall and alcohol as a way to counter the downer effects of alcohol. After drinking too much, people tend to pass out and miss the fun of a party. To avoid this, people sometimes take a stimulant like Adderall to keep themselves up.

What they don’t realize is that Adderall and alcohol interact to bring out the worst in each other. First, since people don’t pass out after taking Adderall, they are motivated to keep drinking. They don’t feel the body’s natural signals that it may be time to stop.

That can lead to alcohol poisoning, killing a person.

Adderall and alcohol can also affect a person’s behavioral health when mixed, leading to an increase in aggression. People change when they take Adderall and alcohol together, and it’s rarely for the better.

Mixing Adderall And Alcohol Can Be A Sign Of Addiction

When people willingly mix the two recreationally, it can be a huge sign of addiction. Adderall and alcohol are not meant to go together, and if someone derives pleasure from the sensation of it, they may be at risk of developing severe issues. They may need to talk to a professional to prevent worse issues from developing.

For that, we’re here. Contact us if you or a loved one may need help, and we’ll take the first steps with you towards getting help.

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by Brittany Polansky

Brittany PolanskyBrittany has been working in behavioral health since 2012 and is a Primary Clinician at our facility. She is an LCSW and holds a master’s degree in social work. She has great experience with chemical dependency and co-occurring mental health diagnoses as well as various therapeutic techniques. Brittany is passionate about treating all clients with dignity and respect, and providing a safe environment where clients can begin their healing journey in recovery.